ANSWERS: 27
  • You did that on purpose?
  • It helps if you want to write a letter to potential employers, especially if you wish to ask whether the weather has weathered the weatherman
  • It does in a lot of situations. Like on resumes and job applications. People tend to not take someone as seriously if you are not a good speller.
  • Urm not really i suppose, but if you are in a job where you need to wirte letters or write stuff alot, i suppose then yeah it does matter because you wouldnt want a letter with loads of mistakes in would you?
  • LOL, yes. I feel like you just asked weather if it likes to spell!
  • Yes. By my ability to express myself properly, I am able to let others know that I consider myself a worthwhile person who takes pride in her words. When you open your mouth, or write something down, you immediately indicate to others either your level of education, or your level of laziness. People judge you based on the way you choose your words to speak, and how you spell and write. Choose well, and express who you really are.
  • In terms of being an object of humor.. aye, indeed.
  • It's the difference between getting your idea across to someone and not getting it across to them even if it is stormy out.
  • The written word is hard enough to interpret, without being misspelled. Example: The many different religions that use the Bible as their standard and still can't agree on what it says. So my answer is yes ........ unless you never write anything!
  • If you want to be taken seriously in a professional capacity, then it absolutely DOES matter.
  • Yes, it is a sign of higher education, or intelligence. Here is something "phunny". I think with the invention of spell checkers, you would think that good spelling is with in (I mean, within) everyone’s grasp. But many times I have typed form when I meant from—and, of course, the spell checker said nothing. A high school teacher once told me that students who interchange then and than usually can not (oops—one word: cannot) find the error even when told there is an error in their sentences. By Diane Sandford http://www.llrx.com/columns/grammar12.htm
  • only if you want to do be a functioning human in the modern world
  • It helps but I don't think you should be brow beaten if you aren't.
  • It does if your profession is connected with teaching in any way. Students lose confidence in teachers very quickly and it is near impossible to regain their respect.
  • It's a pet peeve of mine. I can roll with it when it's just from typing too fast, but it drives me nuts when it's a word the person has obviously been spelling wrong their whole life. I see it as a sign of intelligence. However, I don't judge a poor speller solely on their spelling. The word 'definitely' drives me crazy when people spell it 'definately'. And 'their, they're and there'...man, some poeple have no clue and just seem to think they're interchangeable words. The other day I commented on someone's answer who had spelled there, their and they're incorrectly FOUR TIMES in the first sentence of their answer...sheeeesh. Now, that's just crazy.
  • It does if you are in a spelling Bee!!!!
  • If you were asking a question about the possibility of rain and you wrote "I wonder weather the weather is going to be sonny or not" it wouldn't make any cents. "I wonder whether the weather is going to be sunny or not" makes a lot more sense. It is much easier to communicate if you spell the words correctly.
  • It may not matter always..especially if you have spellcheck (which you don't with AB, obviously!) However, in your working career it is likely to matter sometimes. You may lose opportunities if you spell things incorrectly in letters, reports, articles..or whatever you may have to write. It certainly will annoy you bosses, if they happen to be good spellers!!
  • I'm not a great speller, I wish I was though. My daughter had a 4.0 in college and she can't spell very well either. So, it's not something that carries over to all facets of learning.
  • Yes, it is a sign of higher education, or intelligence. Here is something "phunny". I think with the invention of spell checkers, you would think that good spelling is with in (I mean, within) everyone’s grasp. But many times I have typed form when I meant from—and, of course, the spell checker said nothing. A high school teacher once told me that students who interchange then and than usually can not (oops—one word: cannot) find the error even when told there is an error in their sentences. By Diane Sandford http://www.llrx.com/columns/grammar12.htm
  • Yes, for it really ticked me off that you said "weather" instead of "whether"!
  • I am a terrible speller. I tryt very hard to choose words I can spell while I am writing. Poor spelling and penminship gives the impression of ignorance.
  • my daughter is in school to become a doctor. she is very dexletic, but has a very high iq. im the same and so is here father. none of us can spell very well. other than being a little annoying to some of you, can you look over it. i understand getting upset at text talk thats lazy. but if someone tries let it go.i can make out what people are saying, and so can you.
  • Oh, how I love the irony in this question... intended or not.
  • As far as personality of the person, I don't think it's a reflection of the person. I happen to be one who has won two spelling bees married to someone who isn't such a good speller and he's a wonderful person, but as far as professionalism and getting yourself across to someone by the written word, I think it is absolutely key.
  • 1) "Poor spelling skills are associated with limited intellectual ability in our society, and carry a negative stigma. Limited spelling capabilities not only reflect poorly on the individual, but also on the companies that employ them. Surveys of Fortune 500 companies in 1978, 1985, and 1995, published in the Career Development Journal, focused on trends in the evaluation of resumes. Compared to earlier years, the later survey found more emphasis on grammar and spelling: More weight was given to a candidate's spelling skills than even their grade average or previous work experience. With spelling and language skills on a continuous decline, mastery in this area is more than ever taken as an indicator of a superior education, an hard-working character and intelligence. Spell checkers do not replace knowledge Since spell checkers are widely available today, many frustrated students (and frequently even their parents and teachers) have decided not to worry about their declining spelling skills. However, research shows that spell checkers and similar tools may actually cause poor spelling development (Graham, 2000). Giving spell checkers the final authority over one's writing hurts language awareness along with memorization and visualization skills - the building blocks to correct spelling. In addition, spell checkers only catch a limited range of errors (MacArthur, Graham, Hayes & De La Paz, 1996). To say that spellcheckers have made learning unnecessary is similar in its logic to stating that obesity is not a problem, since cars can transport us, even if our bodies can't - a statement not likely to be advocated. Knowledge buried in a computer's memory is little help in kindling inspiration, fostering critical thinking, and promoting mental development. To develop solid language skills is to equip oneself with the raw materials for complex thought and the essential tools for communication. Spelling is an important building block in developing solid language skills. The role of spelling Incorrect spelling is known to affect both our writing and reading capabilities. Lack of skills will make us avoid uncommon words, resulting in prose that is void of advanced vocabulary and likely fails to please and impress. Academic performance and grades will be affected too, since individuals with low spelling confidence and skills not only write less and more plainly, but may simply not be empowered to adequately express their knowledge in various subject areas. In addition, the correlation between spelling and reading skills has been acknowledged by many researchers. Not only are strong readers better spellers, but low spelling skills measurably hinder a students reading ability." "Many studies have correlated the active possession of an expansive vocabulary with success on numerous levels: Professional, financial, and interpersonal. By contrast, individuals with remedial verbal skills often have difficulty in organizing and expressing complex thoughts, and lose their voice in society. “Literacy can be thought of as a currency in this society,” states the summary of the National Assessment of Adult Literacy. Americans of low language skills are more likely to be unemployed, live in poverty, or become incarcerated. They are much less likely to vote or become actively involved in their communities." Source and further information: http://www.espindle.org/whitepaperenglishspelling.html 2) Interestingly, my browser integrated spell checker does not find any error in your question. However, the more evolved MS-Word spell checker suggests replacing "weather" with "whether".
  • In most cases, yes. Employment, education, and other places require it. It's not hard to learn really. You need only to learn the spelling rules and then remember the exceptions.

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