ANSWERS: 3
  • Cucumber, they become pickles, which in themselves are versatile.
    • Peace
      I like french fries wrapped up in pickle chips.
    • Linda Joy
      Have you ever made pickles? Corn is another big performer! It can make fuel, and cereal. And sugar.
    • bostjan64
      Rice might be just a little more versatile than corn. Sure, you have corn flour, corn puffs, corn syrup, popcorn, etc., but rice can do almost all of those things (even pop), plus, there is rice wine, rice noodles, rice crispies, rice pilaf, and I've never seen anyone put corn in their salt shaker to keep it from clumping.
    • mushroom
      Rice vinegar and rice tea.
    • Linda Joy
      I know corn is considered both a grain and a vegetable, depending on the state its in, but is rice? I guess I always thought of it as a grain. Didn't they invent puffed rice by shooting it out of a cannon? Wait, rice syrup? I've never heard of any kind of rice sugar. That would be a tough call though if I'd rather have to do without rice products or corn products! I agree they are both powerhouses!
  • I'm with you on the potato. Mashed potato, whipped potato, scalloped potato, home fries, french fries, hash browns/potato pancakes, baked potato, potato salad, ... and then use the liquid left over from cooking potatoes to make pretty much anything else. I've seen people try interesting things with cauliflower, but I think that the issue there is that the veggie has a stronger flavour of its own, so there is more personality to overcome in order to make a dish stand out beyond the ingredient. A plain raw potato really doesn't have any personality, so it's easier to bend the potato to your will and make it do something new.
    • Linda Joy
      I remember eating them raw as a kid sprinkled with salt. My ex loved fried potatoes and onions. And baked potatoes can be dressed a million ways! And you can used instant mashed potatoes to thicken soups. I hear the Irish have a love-hate relationship with the potato. It nourished them to double their numbers and then starved them to death during the potato blight!
    • bostjan64
      I've never been able to eat raw potato. I tried one once, and didn't find it too easy to eat, kind of like biting a rock. Potato flakes, though, have a hundred and one uses! The potato blight actually affected a lot of countries other than Ireland. Ireland was already in a tough position at the time, recovering from the British invasion and a series of other unfortunate events, so it was sort of the last straw for a large number of Irish who emigrated during the famine.
  • Potatoes without a doubt.

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