ANSWERS: 44
  • 'OK. Can I ask what handicap?' (because I would be interested if you would disclose) and 'How are things for you in general at the moment?' (because I would say that anyway!)
  • I would say that he/she should be loved just like a child without a handicap.
  • I wouldn't say anything different than if you said you had a child that wasn't handicapped. Some people have "special needs" but that does not mean that they should be put into a different category as the rest of us. I don't really like the term handicapped..I prefer inconvenienced. You have to admire people who have obstacles to overcome, especially when most of them do overcome them with such determination and courage. :-)
  • i would ask you what in particular was handicapped with him/her... maybe how is that for you? how old is he/she? im not sure but if people tell me about their family weather they be handicapped or not, i take an interest and ask questions, because they are telling me about their family and im happy to hear.
  • What's their name? How old? I bet your a fantastic parent. What is it thats wrong with them?
  • I'd say "there are lots of supports in the community and I can help you navigate the system if you ever need that". I'd make sure you had all the tools you need to give your child and your family the best quality of life possible. Children with disabilities are often disenfranchised unless their parents know how to advocate for them in their healthcare, durable medical equipment, in home services, education and vocational services.
  • I want to work with children with special needs. How old are they.
  • Congratulations to both you and your daughter. You both have obviously worked very hard to get where you are. I am curious b/c I also have a handicap, did she use disability services while in college?
  • i would keep going with what ever we had been talking about before hand because i dont really care about him or her being handicapped. i would not treat you differently. if anything i may ask why you felt the need to bring it up and if you were just looking for the sympathy that i can guaruntee you would not get from me.
  • I would ask you the name, age, sex, etc...just like I would anyone who told me about their child. If you needed to talk/vent to someone or needed help in some way..I would listen and try to help...if you wanted to celebrate or brag..I would listen and congragulate...
  • I'd ask what the handicap was, age, sex, etc.
  • Well first off, I wouldn't expect you to say that your child was handicapped. For two reasons: These days it's referred to as disability and two, there wouldn't be any need to bring it into the conversation unless we were talking specifically about something that would directly affect the child and his/her disability. As to what I would say, I'd ask whether the child was a boy or girl and what age.If you then wished to volunteer more information then that's fine. If the child was standing there with you then I'd speak directly to them, not via you. I still have the horrors of a man I knew years ago who had a blind daughter. She was a beautiful lass but he was clearly uncomfortable with the whole thing. He would walk up to people and with her standing next to him, point at her and say "this is my daughter" and then loudly whisper from behind his hand "sorry but she's blind". Apart from the fact that it was blatantly obvious that she was blind, she was also stood there listening to how disappointed her father was in her. We all have a disability of some sort. Some are very mild and easy to hide, others not so. If you can find me a perfect human being then I'll believe it when I see it.
  • Give them a lot of support, and help them to achieve the things that they want to do. I would say the same things, if you had a child that was not handicapped, also. :-)
  • I wouldn't say much different than I would say had you never said it, but if you were down about it and wanted to talk about it, I would tell you that there is a reason you were chosen to be that child's mother (or father) as I think that for the most part (and I am sure there are exceptions) only the most capable are chosen to be parents/gifts to these exceptional children.
  • Hi, how are you? How is the family? I wouldn't really think about your child having a handicap. My sister was diagnosed with polio before I was born. I grew up thinking she was just my sister, not my hanicapped sister.
  • i would want to know what obsticles she and your family had faced and how you've all over come them~ i would also encourage her to follow her dreams no matter what the handicap.....it's only a handicap if she thinks it is :) . . . i just now read one of your comments about her upcoming college graduation and you tell her i said......"you go, girl"!!! congratulations!!! i'm hoping that my 3 boys will do the same~
  • My first words would be "How can I help?" I was born with Epilepsy so I know what it's like. I watched my Mom work 2 jobs to cover the pharmacy bills.
  • The word handicapped is an offenive term and out of date. Child with a disaiblity is the correct term. Think of people with disability as people first. There are many talent people with all kinds of disaiblities. Fouce on the child ability
  • "That's cool I guess. I'm straight. Anything else you would like to randomly blurt out to me?"
  • "Really? How is your child handicapped?" I would be curious and want to know.
  • I would tell you that God has blessed you in a very special way and that He chose you for this situation because He knew you could handle it. A child is a blessing from God. Thank Him each day for your child.
  • you should not degrade yourself . challenges faced is directly proprotional to courage.now-a-days children are handicapped in their thoughts,courage,etc . so handicapped child is not handicapped in their thoughts ,behaviour,etc .SO ENCOURAGE YOUR CHILD TO BE THE BEST.
  • tip my hat ... i know how difficult disabillity can be
  • I would really respect you. "You're a good man" xD
  • join the club.
  • I wouldn't say anything.
  • hmmm, did you just come up to me on the street and say it? Or were we acquainted already? Depends. If you just came up to me and said it point blank, I would say "and...?" but if we knew each other, I would say, "that must be a challenge sometimes, glad you're so strong. Let me know if I can do anything to lighten your load, if your load does indeed need lightening."
  • I wouldn't say anything. I might ask if is a boy or girl, how old is your child, what does he/she like to do?
  • It would depend on the context, but a parent who tells you probably wants to talk about it. I have a disability, and my parents always felt guilty and responsible, though they were not at fault in any way. I think that nothing in their lives hurt them more that my accident and the constant reminder of seeing their daughter with one leg. My disability has always been a much, much greater emotional burden for them than for me, even though I live with it. For me, I'm just the way I am- it is my own normality. So be sensitive to the feelings of parents. Try to pick up cues and give them support and attention if they need it. They may only want you to listen, or they may be simply trying to give you practical information so that you know how to interact with them or their child.
  • Bragging or complaining. Mr Bill
  • I would want to know what kind of handicap it is. I think of my sister-in-law who claimed to charities, the government, basically anybody offering a handout, that all of her children are disabled... when in reality a couple of them have only have a mild attention deficit (due to bad parenting).
  • Boy or girl, i would ask/-
  • Depending on the context of the conversation, I would ask what the handi-cap was and continue the conversation. A person is not defined by their handi-cap. It is just one part of that person's life.
  • Not much except congratulations and be a good parent.
  • How is there health; are they happy; Can I help you with anything?
  • What is his handicap?
  • I would not say much at all as I am physically disabled.In life you play the cards you are dealt! In life there is alway around problems it keeps ones mind sharp.I don't try to hide my disability or look for pity and get around ok.I am a member of a few clubs for disabled persons on the internet and have a few fans that contact me.I hope this gives you some insight into our world.Its not gloom and doom,far from it.
  • Nothing is wrong! God plans for everyone. God bless and loves you all.
  • Hi nice to meet you...
  • Hello??
  • sorry to here that
  • Kudos to you. Be prepared for a strenuous life, but one that offers great rewards.
  • i have spina bifida.so i know what people are really like,honestly just love them for them.thats all i want people to do,if they have a question i say ask me! chances are i've herd them all before.

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