ANSWERS: 50
  • "The lady doth protest too much, methinks."
  • "You see me...where I stand, such as I am"
  • To thine own self be true, and it follows as night follows day, thou canst be untrue to no man.
  • "Come, let me clutch thee !" (Macbeth) Reminds me of my car and my woman, both at the same time.........
  • "The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers." Henry VI.
  • From "Julius Caesar" "The fault dear Brutus, is not in our stars but in ourselves...”
  • Mother, i am here!!!! Romeo and Juilet, LOVE IT!
  • Shakespeare Measure for Measure His friend admits he has syphilis ... I did a paper on disease and Elizabethean England in college ... it's both sad and funny: "I will, out of thine own confession, learn to begin thy health; [toast] but, whilst I live, forget to drink after thee."
  • Stand and unfold yourself! -Hamlet I remember my roommates (3 biology majors who hated English) reading that with me to help me with my homework (I get more out of Shakespeare when I see and hear it) and they couldn't stop laughing because they were envisioning someone attempting to unfold themselves. Totally ruined the mood ;)
  • "In nature there's no blemish but the mind; none can be called deform'd but the unkind" Twelfth N, Act iii, Sc.4
  • ---------To be or not to be-------, that is the question— Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, And by opposing, end them. To die, to sleep— No more; and by a sleep to say we end The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks That flesh is heir to — 'tis a consummation Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep— To sleep, perchance to dream. Ay, there's the rub, For in that sleep of death what dreams may come, When we have shuffled off this mortal coil, Must give us pause. There's the respect That makes calamity of so long life, For who would bear the whips and scorns of time, Th'oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely, The pangs of despis'd[1] love, the law's delay, The insolence of office, and the spurns That patient merit of th'unworthy takes, When he himself might his quietus make With a bare bodkin? who would fardels bear, To grunt and sweat under a weary life, But that the dread of something after death, The undiscover'd country from whose bourn No traveller returns, puzzles the will, And makes us rather bear those ills we have Than fly to others that we know not of? Thus conscience does make cowards of us all, And thus the native hue of resolution Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought, And enterprises of great pitch[2] and moment With this regard their currents turn awry, And lose the name of action.[3]
  • fie on the wretch its a pity where honest men resort... comedy of errors
  • ready?........ok........."To be or not to be-That is the question!" lol....
  • Macbeth, Act 2, Scene 2, the Drunk Porter: Alcohol 'provokes the desire, but takes away the performance'. Full quotation: "Lechery, sir, it provokes, and unprovokes; it provokes 30 the desire, but it takes away the performance. There- 31 fore, much drink may be said to be an equivocator 32 with lechery: it makes him, and it mars him; it sets him 33 on, and it takes him off; it persuades him, and dis- 34 heartens him; makes him stand to, and not stand to; in 35 conclusion, equivocates him in a sleep, and, giving him 36 the lie, leaves him."
  • I will here be with thee presently; and if I bring thee not something to eat, I'll give thee leave to die: but if thou diest before I come, thou art a mocker of my labour. Act 2 Scene 2 of As You Like It
  • "Frailty, thy name is woman!" - Hamlet. Never fails to start a conversation, that one!
  • "there's a double meaning in that" much ado about nothing
  • "How bitter a thing it is to look into happiness through another man's eyes!" - As You Like It
  • Hamlet: If thou didst ever hold me in thy heart Absent thee from felicity awhile, And in this harsh world draw thy breath in pain To tell my story. Horatio: Good night, sweet prince, And flights of angels sing thee to thy rest.
  • "Lead on, McDuff." I say it all the time.... even in theaters with gets me in no END of trouble...
  • Demetrius: You have undone our mother! Arron the Moor: Villain, I have done thy mother. awww yeahhhh
  • a rose by any other name smells just as great.
  • "To be or not to be that is the question"
  • "Men at some time are masters of their fates: The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, But in ourselves,that we are underlings". Julius Caesar (Act I, Scene II)
  • I'm not exactly an expert on Shakespeare, I'm only familiar with Romeo and Juliet, A midsummer night's dream and Macbeth. For an essay once I had to remember quotes from a midsummer night's dream and the one that always stuck in my head was 'crystal is muddy, oh how ripe in show. Your lips, those kissing cherries tempting grow'. I have absolutely no idea why, or if that's even right but I'll go with that. :)
  • "a rose by any other name will still smell as sweet"
  • "Where are my switzers?" From Hamlet. Said by Claudius. Absolutely hilarious.
  • From| Love's Labour's Lost | Act 4, Scene 3 From women's eyes this doctrine I derive: They sparkle still the right Promethean fire; They are the books, the arts, the academes, That show, contain, and nourish all the world.
  • Lady Macbeth: Infirm of purpose! Bring me the dagger! (Repeated with only insignificant variations at every breakfast table between every man and wife at least once a week since Adam awoke to find Eve -- though today its more likely to be: "Infirm of purpose! Get me the telephone!")
  • i have a few romeo and Juliet "that by which you would call a rose would smell as sweet" you are a lover - borrow cupids wings and soar with them above a common bound" macbeth "fill me from the crown to the toe top-full Of direst cruelty!" (l like this whole speech from Lady Macbeth) Antony and Cleopatra "I have fled myself; and have instructed cowards To run and show their shoulders." And is become the bellows and the fan To cool a gipsy's lust. i apologise for any misquotes in advance!!!
  • 'If it be now tis not to come, if it is to come, t'will not be now, since no man of aught he leaves knows aught, THE READINESS IS ALL - LET BE'. and 'there are more things in Heaven and Earth Horatio than are dreamt of in our philosphy. lots more...
  • "For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright. Who art as black as hell, as dark as night."
  • "There is nothing that is good or bad that thinking does not make it so"
  • "Your tale,sir,would cure deafness" The Tempest.
  • Hamlet: To be, or not to be, that is the question: Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles And by opposing end them. To die—to sleep, No more; and by a sleep to say we end The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks That flesh is heir to: 'tis a consummation Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep; To sleep, perchance to dream—ay, there's the rub: For in that sleep of death what dreams may come, When we have shuffled off this mortal coil, Must give us pause—there's the respect That makes calamity of so long life. For who would bear the whips and scorns of time, Th'oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely, The pangs of dispriz'd love, the law's delay, The insolence of office, and the spurns That patient merit of th'unworthy takes, When he himself might his quietus make With a bare bodkin? Who would fardels bear, To grunt and sweat under a weary life, But that the dread of something after death, The undiscovere'd country, from whose bourn No traveller returns, puzzles the will, And makes us rather bear those ills we have Than fly to others that we know not of? Thus conscience does make cowards of us all, And thus the native hue of resolution Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought, And enterprises of great pitch and moment With this regard their currents turn awry And lose the name of action.
  • but soft, what light through yonder window breaks? it is the east, and juliet is the sun. arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, who is already sick and pale with grief that thou, her maid, art far more fair than she...romeo & juliet boil, boil, toil & trouble, fire burn & cauldron bubble... macbeth (i think the witches are a gas!) nothing will come of nothing...king lear all that glitters is not gold...merchant of venice the lady doth protest too much, methinks...hamlet and the all time classic...to be or not to be... that is the ?...hamlet
  • "Make less thy body hence, and more thy grace; Leave gormandizing; know the grave doth gape For thee thrice wider than for other men." HenryIV
  • Oh goodness that's hard! I adore his whole "Let me not to the marriage of true mins admit impediments" sonnet... Hamlet has some increddible quotes...obv "One half of me is yours, the other half...yours" There are so many random ones...ha
  • Much Ado about Nothing :) "Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more, Men were deceivers ever,- One foot in sea and one on shore, To one thing constant never." brilliant characters and hysterical plot
  • Praising what is lost Makes the remembrance dear. - "All's Well that Ends Well"
  • Hamlet to Opehlia: "Get thee to a nunn'ry" back in the day, a nunnery could mean brothel
  • From Titus Andronicus: "Rome is but a wilderness of tigers. Tigers must prey, and Rome affords no prey but me and mine."
  • are we all met? a midsummers nights dream
  • "Thine face is not worth sunburning." Henry V "You are as a candle, the better burnt out." Henry IV "Away! Thou art poison to my blood." Cymbeline "Let's meet as little as we can." As you Like It "Away, you 3 inch fool." Taming of the Shrew The list goes on. ;) Shakespeare insults are the best...
  • "This nothing's more than madness." -Polonius, after Hamlet's words, words, words speech.
  • "All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players;" (As you like it) i love this quote :)
  • I would as lief not be, as live to be in fear (might be awe) of such a one as I myself. Don't know where it comes from, though it is probably Julius Caesar.
  • One of the only Shakespeare line I know.. "Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn and caldron bubble. Fillet of a fenny snake, In the caldron boil and bake; Eye of newt and toe of frog, Wool of bat and tongue of dog, Adder's fork and blind-worm's sting, Lizard's leg and howlet's wing, For a charm of powerful trouble, Like a hell-broth boil and bubble. " From Macbeth
  • No legacy is so rich as honesty.
  • Neither a borrower nor a lender be, For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry. ~ Old Polonius

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