ANSWERS: 40
  • Those many people can build a bridge, and get over it. We are here to stay.
  • i have a classic case of the don't give a f**k's. people find the dumbest things to get offended by.
  • He said: "We are a nation of Christians and Muslims, Jews and Hindus, and nonbelievers." I think he is right.
  • Yes, I feel that may be the cause of all of the unrest among the believers around here. They feel that their rampant reign of terror has finally come to and end and not a day too soon. If Bush had stayed in the White House one more year, we would have reverted to the days of burning Atheists at the stake
  • I would have been far more bothered if they hadn't been acknowledged. Those who are bothered are simply bigots, who should all be sent off to Alaska anyway and should never be given the indulgence of being listened to, since each and every one of them is a complete and utter waste of space. :o)
  • If you belive he knows that the President of The United States must be most careful and thoughtout, more so than anyone on this planet, then it should make you a bit uneasy yo...
  • As the president he has to consider all who live here. The bulk are Christian, however, there are many other types of faith or non-faith's if you will. All must be represented in our country. Just because you don't agree with their personal choice doesn't limit there constitutional rights. And gives me someone to add to my prayers at night. :)
  • You mean, people are actually making a fuss about this? pff, Americans, wouldn't touch them with a ten foot pole. Even if i had one. Which I don't. eh, two countries separated by a common language.
  • I think it's about time someone acknowledge us. For one thing, there are more non-believers in the U.S. than there are Jews, for example. I remember George H.W. Bush said that if it were up to him, atheists would not be allowed to hold public office. I lost a lot of respect for him that day.
  • What about Buddhists, Wiccans, Druids, Native Ameicans and others? They are the ones who should be upset. As for the ones who were bothered, a great big RAAAZZZZBERRY to you!
  • Kinda weird how a lot of his speeches included mention of the foundation of America, praising the forefathers and upholding the American dream and essence and so forth, which technically is, or was, done so mostly by Christian faith, and now he goes and says this, ha ha. Still, I like to think that he's honest and means it, even if it sounds contradictory to me. That some people aren't happy to have folks with different ideas and mind frames shows just how slow we are at advancing. I don't know if his new found ideas will lead America to a better and brighter future, maybe, maybe not, but it's not like the previous mentality helped much, so far. And there have always BEEN Atheists, Muslims and whatever else in America. I don't think he's trying to redefine America as a whole, rather than stating what it already is. And what's he gonna do, kick everyone out who isn't a Christian? Might as well use diversity and unity, that is, if the people themselves can get along.
  • I don't really understand the fuss. In fact, I would rather agree with him. - The trouble is (theologically) is that most every Christian has adopted replacement theology. That is to say they believe that the Church is meant to take the place of Israel in regards to every promise given to Israel in Scripture. The present state of Israel is an anomaly, merely a bunch of crazy Jews. - This view leads them to want to enforce morality through very temporal means (the state) and create a sort of kingdom of God on earth (this view has been largely predominant in theology since the time of Constantine). - I would contend that this is an erroneous view. The job of believers isn't to replace governments and reform society. Morality can't be enforced through legislation. America isn't a Christian nation at all; it is precisely what the President stated it is. (Feel free to ask questions and poke holes here, as I have only given a brief overview of what I believe the situation is)
  • America is made up of people of different beliefs..including non-believers. Everyone should be acknowledged, you can't just ignore someone because they happen to believe a certain way. Non believers contribute just as much to the success of this country as believers.
  • I am bothered that there were people bothered by it. I'm also rather surprised to read that this was the first time it happened.
  • It may be true that there are still fewer atheists than those of religions, but this is something that will change. Obama did the right thing there, he didn't really insult anyone by a simple acknowledgment.
  • We ARE a nation of christians, muslims, jews, non-believers and many other things! America's strengths do lie in it's diversity! I don't back Obama any more than any other President there has been but how people can be upset about this is retarded..it wasn't even a nod to non-believers, he mentioned a couple different faiths as well and what's wrong with including non-believers? We indeed exists and make up a section of the voting populace do we not? We pay taxes and own land and are citizens of the USA with rights and freedoms are we not? People are retarded to get upset about this statement. Since when was it assumed everyone with a voice in this country had to be christian or muslim or religious at all?! Freedom of religion IS a freedom we enjoy is it not? That means we have a right to choose NOT to have a religion as well! All it really comes down to is that neocons are freakin out now the Bush isn't in office making calls to pedophiles and drug user priests and pastors and such in Colorado and Vatican City every week now and they fear their political hold might slip. As I said I am not Pro-Obama but he just earned some points with me!
  • I think it was a statement of fact. The country is made up, in fact, of the people he described, in addition to others who don't fit the categories he mentioned. If people don't like facts, that is their problem.
  • Overjoyed! Contrary to popular belief/opinion, America is NOT a Theocracy. The Christians may think they own the entire multiverse, but our founding fathers mentioned freedom of religion in the first amendment for a reason. We are a free country. Free to disbelieve if we choose to do so. To think otherwise is, at best, unpatriotic. Those who claim we are a nation of God are terrorists, only they use dogma and hatred instead of explosives and airplanes.
  • He was just saying what beliefs Americans have. I see nothing wrong with this, and I am a Christian. Of course, he didn't have the time (or sufficient attention span from those watching) to actually name all of the various belief systems in this country, so if anything I was surprised he brought it up at all. People who get uppity about the mere mention of another belief system might want to examine the strength of their own faith.
  • What's wrong with acknowledging non-believers? Why would it bother people?
  • "non-believers" seems to have a derogatory connotation. A more appropriate term should have been used: "agnostic" or even "athiest". Eiher that or he should have just said: "believers and non-believers". Yet even that would have been confusing. Believers in what? To say "non-believers" suggests their beliefs are "wrong". That was a no-no. It's strange that Obama is such a strong supporter of abortion yet declares himself a Christian. What exactly is he?
  • It just nonplusses me why it is all right to talk about god and all the religious stuff and yet it is wrong not to acknowledge those who don't believe it. Mr. Obama is a genius at being reasonable to ALL people. The christian far-right better get used to fairness for a change.
  • I hadn't heard about Bishop Jackson's statement. To him I say, "Too bloody bad!" He doesn't just look down on atheists, either. What he said was, "Obviously, Jewish heritage is very much a part of Christianity; the Jewish Bible is part of our Bible. But Hindu, Muslim, and nonbelievers? I don't think so. We are not a Muslim nation or a nonbelieving nation." So everyone who isn't Christian is bad in this guy's eyes. Even Jewish folks only get a grudging acknowledgement. Charming fellow.
  • I feel glad that he is reaching out to everyone who voted for him....
    • Mr PantsFellDown
      f*ck your coat
  • I can't believe that people would get so wound up about this - does it bloody matter?! All he did was acknowledge that there are non-believers - it would be far more worrying if he didn't acknowledge this. This is typical of so many peoples' eagerness to jump on any pseudo-religious bandwagon in order to promote their particular faiths/beliefs, with the implication that anyone who doesn't agree is wrong/going straight to hell. As an outside observer (in the UK), I'm becoming really concerned at how the US appears to be getting more religiously fundamental every day, when debates kick off over something as trivial as this.
  • LOL, What a bunch of tools. They are so insecure in their faith, that they shudder from just hearing the word "non-believers"!? I'd have thought the people not mentioned (Buddhists, Sikhs) might be more upset...but then again, it usually is just Abraham's folks who get hot and bothered over nothing, isn't it?
  • How every other president has gotten away with not naming a 15% voting block is beyond me. Every time Obama opens his mouth I like him more. January 20th 2017 will be a very bad day for me I fear.
  • I'd say it's about fucking time we had a president that wasn't afraid of organized religion. You go, Obama!
  • It just shows the man doesn`t believe in anything, which is a very scary thought.
  • Obamanos! I'm upset that I think it's so great, though. I should feel that me belief systems are fairly represented by my government, but I haven't felt that way for almost a decade. Now we've elected someone that actually seems to understand my concerns, as one of those "nonbelievers." I feel very little sympathy for those offended, try being the one never mentioned. Does anyone else worry Obama is too good to be true? Like an alien monster is going to explode out of him one day?
  • I was very touched by what he said. It's about time someone acknowledged us non believers!
  • Very pleased. His campaign was about inclusion, why would his speech be any different? I think critics of this part of his speech need to find something else to discuss, particularly given the state of the world right now.
  • Relieved and very pleased that he's actively seeking rational input. What a refreshing change!
  • I didn't/don't think it should have been controversial. He made a valid point - the country is made up of many different groups of people with different beliefs. What's to debate?
  • So these offended people want to keep regarding atheists as "the other", not a true part of our country, and not to be fully trusted, or maybe a threat to believers, I guess. O's statement was a simple fact.
  • I'm glad Obama mentioned us, instead of ignoring the fact that there's a sizable chunk of Americans that don't have imaginary friends like so many other politicians do. If the Abrahamic folk want to get offended, they will find SOMETHING to get offended about. That's what they do.
  • I didnt vote for Obama- I didnt like Obama- but I really like that he said this. Nice job Bam. Science is the way to go, and keep it going with stem cell research.
  • "We are a nation of Christians and Muslims, Jews and Hindus, and nonbelievers." It is a simple statement of fact. Would you rather he pretended that non-believers did not exist? Would you like a President who denied facts when they didn't match his prejudices. That is what GWB did: he wanted there to be WMDs in Iraq, and for there to be links between Saddam and Al Qaeda, and ignored evidence that there were none.
  • Hopefully, it's a sign of better days ahead. It's about time that reason and common sense come to America too; they've been a part of everyday life throughout Canada, Europe, Australia, etc., yet, the US is still living in a Post Dark Ages world. Sad, how very sad and this is what they want to 'export' into other countries of the world
  • I believe Thomas Jefferson said it better: "The bill for establishing religious freedom, the principles of which had, to a certain degree, been enacted before, I had drawn in all the latitude of reason & right. It still met with opposition; but, with some mutilations in the preamble, it was finally passed; and a singular proposition proved that it's protection of opinion was meant to be universal. Where the preamble declares that coercion is a departure from the plan of the holy author of our religion, an amendment was proposed, by inserting the word "Jesus Christ," so that it should read "a departure from the plan of Jesus Christ, the holy author of our religion." The insertion was rejected by a great majority, in proof that they meant to comprehend, within the mantle of it's protection, the Jew and the Gentile, the Christian and Mahometan, the Hindoo, and infidel of every denomination." From Jeffersons autobiography: http://libertyonline.hypermall.com/Jefferson/Autobiography.html regards JakobA

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