ANSWERS: 11
  • how is it possible?
  • How is it possible to pitch a perfect game and lose? In a perfect game, no one reaches base and therefore cannot score. You can't win without scoring. If someone reaches base or scores, it isn't a perfect game. It is possible to lose a no-hitter, however, due to walks, errors, Hit-By-Pitches, catcher interference, or other ways or reaching base and scoring without getting a hit. This has happened in MLB history. Ken Johnson of the Houston Colt 45's is the only pitcher to lose a complete game no-hitter in nine innings when he was beaten 1-0 by Cincinnati in 1964.
  • GAME 0 TO 0.. Pitcher (A team) strikes everyone out or a fly ball has put them out. 9th inning. team B is at bat. Pitcher strikes the 1st batter out and the catcher drops the ball and the man reaches first base. then steals to second base. 2nd palyer is up hits a fly ball to center field and is caught. guy runs to third base. next player hits the ball to center field and is caught. 2nd out. the guy runs home 1 to 0. it was not the pitchers fault the guy got on first. It was the catchers fault. The pitcher gave up NO hits or WALKS... he pitched a perfect game..has this ever happened? Robbie
  • I ansewred this yesterday...did it get lost in cyberspace???? Robbie
  • Guess I was confused..I had always been told that IF a pitcher himself does NOT make an error..walk..hit a batter or them get a hit then he has pitched a perfect game.... are you sure about what you said???? Robbie
  • (I've modified my answer to say "almost." The comment is correct -- it was not completely a perfect game.) It's almost happened -- Harvey Haddox of the Pittsburgh Pirates. (You see 2 spellings of the last name, one with an "o" and one with an "i.") How did it happen? "He retired 36 consecutive batters in 12 innings, but his Pittsburgh teammates didn't score, as Braves pitcher Lew Burdette was also pitching a shutout. After an error by Don Hoak ended the perfect game, the runner advanced to second on a sacrifice bunt, followed by an intentional walk to Hank Aaron. Joe Adcock then hit a home run (although because Adcock passed Aaron on the basepath for the second out, it was by ruling of National League president Warren Giles a double, ending the no hitter also). Only the first run counted, but the game ended with the Pirates and Haddix losing 1-0. Haddix's 12 and 2/3-inning, one-hit complete game, was the majors' longest ever and is considered by many to be the best pitching performance in major league history." (from Wikipedia) The game is legendary here in Pittsburgh. Pic is of Harvey Haddox/Haddix. He died in 1994.
  • bottom line, a pitcher can't pitch a perfect game and lose it, if the pitcher lose the game then at certain point the game stopped being perfect, or other pitcher lost it or the team lost the game by regulations (as a result of a bad substitution) but that game wouldn't be lost by the pitcher.
  • it is impossible however it is possible to pitch a perfect game and be pulled from the game and still loose b/c the pitcher that replaced you gave up runs,a pitcher that was perfect would not get the decision.
  • In response to TheKnife's answer: There is no such thing as a starting pitcher having a perfect game and not finishing the game. If it goes into extra innings, those innings count the same as the first nine. A perfect game is just that, a perfect GAME. Not a perfect nine-innings, so no, that wouldn't be possible for a starting pitcher to get perfect nine innings and have a reliever blow it.
  • IT NOT POSSIBLE TO LOSE A PERFECT GAME.BUT BACK IN THE EARLY 90'S A NEW YORK YANKEES PITCHER LOSE A NO-HITTER WHEN HIS TEAM HAD FOURS ERRORS INCLUDING A FLY-BALL THAT WENT OFF THE CENTER FIELDERS HEAD.GO METS
  • well im sure it could happen due to forfeit circumstances or something..like a pitcher throws a perfect game, then the next day it is discovered that that team had an ineligible player or something, and the game is forfeited and the team loses, but then again, the perfect game would be forfeited too. thats probably the closest that could ever happen

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